Things do see and do in Giesing

Der Auer Mühlbach in Untergiesing, Foto: muenchen.de / Benedikt Feiten
Foto: muenchen.de / Benedikt Feiten

What you shouldn't miss in Munich's vibrant Giesing district

Giesing is one of Munich's most exciting and vibrant districts. Let us show you what you shouldn't miss in this down-to-earth and yet hip neighborhood.

Auer Mühlbach

Giesing's main traffic road, the Tegernseer Landstraße, is usually quite busy. Completely different from that is the area around the Auer Mühlbach river. Especially around Mondstraße, it is a sensational sight. Along the foot of the Giesinger Berg - the small hill on the eastern Isar riverbank -  stretching between Kolumbusplatz and Candidplatz, there are plenty of historic houses on the waterfront to discover, which are beautiful on their own, but get a real Venetian flair with the backdrop of the creek streaming along. Definitely a corner of the city you don't want to miss.

Take a look at the old craftsmen's houses

Mondstraße in Giesing, Foto: muenchen.de/ Michael Hofmann
Foto: muenchen.de/ Michael Hofmann

Giesing has it all: big city flair with huge residential buildings, but also village character. That is the case especially in the area around the Handwerkerhäusl (Craftsmen's houses) - little houses that don't feel like modern Munich at all. When you walk from the Heilig-Kreuz-Kirche church through the Feldmüllersiedlung around the little streets Obere and Untere Grasstraße, you will feel like taking a troll through the alleys of an historic old town. Between 1830 and 1860 the small one-storey houses were built, which characterise the charm here - pretty flowers and plants around the windows and colourful shutters complete the picturesque atmosphere.

Riffraff

Freunde spielen ein Brettspiel

Relaxed atmosphere, good beer, nice people - welcome to the Riffraff bar. Leave all prejudices about old-fashioned pubs at home and just relax in a wonderfully cosy bar that has become a quick favorite of the Giesinger neighbourhood or all those who have long since found their "second living-room" here on Tegernseer Landstraße. At events like the monthly Giesing Board Game Night, strangers become friends quite quickly.

Take a walk at the Ostfriedhof cemetery

Der Ostfriedhof in Giesing: Das Moshammer-Mausoleum, Foto: muenchen.de/Leonie Liebich
Foto: muenchen.de/Leonie Liebich

Munich's local fashion legend Rudolph Moshammer was not exactly known for modesty during his lifetime - driving around in a Rolls Royce and being accompanied constantly by his Yorkshire Terrier Daisy, he was a more than conspicuous appearance. It's hardly surprising that his grave has also become a magnificent mausoleum. But while walking through the Ostfriedhof (Eastern Cemetery) in Giesing, you will discover even more illustrious personalities - such as former Munich mayor Georg Kronawitter or German "Schlager" pop star Rex Gildo. Of course, one person cannot go unmentioned in Giesing, the traditional home to local football club TSV 1860 München: Rudi Brunnenmaier, who scored goal after goal for the "Löwen"- the lions - during their 1966 championship season.

Hohenwart

Das Wirtshaus Hohenwart in Giesing, Foto: muenchen.de/Leonie Liebich
Foto: muenchen.de/Leonie Liebich

It's hard to find a more traditional inn: the Gasthaus Hohenwart has been around since 1896. Bavarian comedian Gerhard Polt filmed his movie classic "Herr Ober" here - and if you go to the toilet you will hear the legendary humorist crank in his funniest sketches from tape. Although the ambience here, with its bowling alley and wood panelling, is quite rustic, the operators have managed the balancing act between history and modernity in a playful way - roast pork is on the menu next to the excellent celery schnitzel and regular child-care gives parents a little bit of cosiness.

You want more tips for a traditional restaurant experience? Urban station flair and modern furnishings come together in the Gleiswirtschaft. This is where the people of Giesing drop by for a light meal or enjoy Mediterranean flair in the lounge area and the summer terrace. And Das Schulz also combines retro charm with zeitgeist. Snacks, bowls, coffee and cake still taste best at the small tables outside.

Türkitch

Türkitch in Giesing, Foto: muenchen.de/Leonie Liebich
Foto: muenchen.de/Leonie Liebich

Munich hasn't seen a lot of food hypes yet, but this is definitely one: There are often a dozen people hanging around in front of the Türkitch, waiting for falafel, sucuk-halloumi sandwich or Dürüm Döner. The chalkboard with the menu is tightly filled, just because the owners have so many ideas. Cheese-filled Kasarli Köfte, antipasti, homemade ayran and of course kebab in all variations: Instead of drowning everything in dripping yoghurt-garlic sauce, they interpret the dishes lightly, loosely - and manage to make it still taste hearty.

Siebenmachen

Der Laden "Siebenmachen" in Giesing, Foto: muenchen.de/Leonie Liebich
Foto: muenchen.de/Leonie Liebich

Unique pieces from local labels, handmade, individual jewellery or mustard from the neighbourhood - the regional suppliers make many great things, but it's not easy to keep track. In the "siebenmachen Galerieladen" (St.-Bonifatiusstr. 20) you can get to know several artists and designers at once - the team selects everything personally. They pass on the sales price to the exhibitors, but in return each shop takes over the services and shares the costs - in a neighbourly and uncomplicated way.

But of course there are more hotspots for creative gifts nearby: Edible bouquets for example you can get at VeggieFlora. These unusual creations made of fruit, vegetables and herbs are an original alternative to a bouquet of roses.

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