The best of Munich in just 24 hours

Der Alte Peter vom Rathausturm , Foto: muenchen.de/Michael Hofmann
Foto: muenchen.de/Michael Hofmann

Experience Munich in one day

Getting to know Munich in just 24 hours is ambitious. But not impossible. The good thing about Munich: Most of the sights are located in the immediate vicinity of the heart of the city, Marienplatz. This daily tour shows what every visitor should absolutely have seen.

Let's start at Marienplatz

Marienplatz München, Foto: Katy Spichal
Foto: Katy Spichal

The 24-hour tour through Munich begins at Marienplatz. Exactly here was the place of the monks, after whom Munich is named. In 1158 the city was first mentioned in documents as "apud munichen" ("near the monks"). Today Marienplatz is a top location for many shops and cafés, dominated by the neo-Gothic façade of the New Town Hall. Because of its central location, the square is the ideal starting point for a sightseeing tour. And there's always something going on, whether day or night.

9 am: Breakfast: Bavarian, organic or Italian?

Hofbräuhaus München, Foto: BBMC Tobias Ranzinger
Foto: BBMC Tobias Ranzinger

A long sightseeing day needs a good preparation. In Tal 7 there is a venerable, rustic inn, the Schneider Bräuhaus. There you can find many other Bavarian specialities as well as a "Weißwurstfrühstück" (white sausage breakfast). Not only Bavarian, but also vegan breakfast can be had idyllically between Hofbräuhaus and Viktualienmarkt in the Spezlwirtschaft, which can be found in Munich's second oldest house at Ledererstraße 3. For those who like a quick Italian breakfast, the Bar Centrale in Ledererstraße 23 is the perfect place.

Immediately after breakfast at ten o'clock we go directly to the Platzl just around the corner. One of the oldest and most original squares in Munich, with the world-famous beer palace, the Hofbräuhaus. From the Platzl with its many pretty houses it is not far to the Alter Hof (Old royal court). It was the first Munich palace of the Bavarian ruling dynasty, the Wittelsbachers. Here they resided from the 13th to the 15th century. Today, the traffic-calmed inner courtyard is a peaceful refuge in the middle of the downtown hustle.

11 am - Munich's landmark: "Old Peter" and Frauenkirche

Frauenkirche, Foto: Katy Spichal
Foto: Katy Spichal

Shortly before eleven o'clock, back to Marienplatz. The Glockenspiel in the tower balcony of the New town hall is world famous and worth seeing. Figurines representing stories from Munich’s history twirl at 11:00 a.m. Then we climb high: Just over 300 steps lead to the viewing platform of the church St Peter (known in Munich as Alter Peter or "Old Peter"). From up there you have a wonderful view, not only over Marienplatz, but over the whole of Munich. And on beautiful days your see even the Alps.

Once back down, it is worth taking a short side-trip to Munich's pedestrian zone. After almost a hundred metres in Kaufingerstraße, Liebfrauenstraße offers a view of the highest building in the city centre and Munich's landmark: the Frauenkirche (full name: “Dom zu unserer Lieben Frau” or “Cathedral of Our Dear Lady”) with its two onion-shaped towers. In the mighty interior of the Gothic hall church you can search for the legendary Devil's Step, a black footprint in the floor of the church - or take in the architecture and tranquillity of the church. A small setback: The South Tower, which is usually open to the public, is currently not accessible due to renovation work.

13 o'clock - lunch time, off to the Viktualienmarkt

Viktualienmarkt München, Foto: Katy Spichal
Foto: Katy Spichal

From the largest church in Munich, the journey starts at one o'clock via the Färbergraben and leads to one of the smallest churches in the city, which is nevertheless one of the most spectacular: the Asamkirche in Sendlinger Straße is a jewel of the late baroque period and can hardly be surpassed in its religious splendour. Probably some of you are hungry again. A good reason to visit the next sight: the market Viktualienmarkt. On your way you see the city museum, the Jewish museum, the synagogue and the Schrannenhalle.

Take your time to stroll through the rows of stands at the Viktualienmarkt. This is the perfect place to buy all kinds of delicacies and indulge in a very special Bavarian tradition: the Biergartenbrotzeit - a small meal in the beer garden. This includes cheese, sausage, bread, pretzels, Obatzter, pickled gherkins, spreads, fruit and fruit. At a nice place in the beer garden in the middle of the market, with a cold drink from the tap, you can enjoy the Bavarian way of life.

16 o'clock - Rickshaw ride into nature

Chinesischer Turm im Englischen Garten, Foto: Katy Spichal
Foto: Katy Spichal

The 24-hour tour takes you back to Marienplatz. The rickshaw riders there not only cycle their passengers comfortably through the city, but can also tell a few stories about each sight. The best thing to do is to cycle along the Residenz and across Odeonsplatz and Hofgarten to the English Garden. It is one of the largest city parks in the world, famous for the Monopteros temple, the Chinese Tower and the "naked" visitors in the summertime. Via Siegestor and Ludwigstraße the journey goes back to the old town. You can also easily walk this round.

The rickshaw ride ends at Odeonsplatz. After a short visit to the impressive Feldherrnhalle (Field marshals hall) and the Theatinerkirche, the tour continues along Theatinerstraße into the Fünf Höfe (Five courtyards). These are an award-winning example of newer Munich architecture and make the building complex much more than a mere shopping arcade.

20 o'clock - Dinner time in the old town

Frauenkirche, Foto: Katy Spichal
Foto: Katy Spichal

A long and eventful day will eventually make you hungry. Bavarian cuisine has something for every appetite, no matter how big. One of the most beautiful places for dinner is right behind the Frauenkirche on Sporerstraße. There you have the choice between three traditional restaurants: Andechser am Dom, Nürnberger Bratwurst Glöckl and Augustiner am Dom.

It is advisable to book a table during beforehand. But even without a reservation, you might still manage find a table in one of the three restaurants - but maybe it will just take a little longer before you can enjoy your first sip of beer. And maybe later you might even find out why locals call this area the 'Bermuda Triangle'...

More

X

CORONAVIRUS: DIE AUSWIRKUNGEN AUF MÜNCHEN

Alle Infos
Top